Nothing duff about these Co-Cos

‘Royal’ loco No. 47798 (formerly 1656), was one of a pair of Class 47s (the other was No. 47799) employed on Royal Train duties (and painted accordingly) between 1995-2004. The machine is seen at the NRM, York, on May 25, 2004 where it is now preserved.

To celebrate 60 years of British Railways’ Brush Type 4 diesel electric locos (later designated Class 47), we present a small selection of images from the Mortons Archive.

‘Royal’ loco No. 47798 (formerly 1656), was one of a pair of Class 47s (the other was No. 47799) employed on Royal Train duties (and painted accordingly) between 1995-2004. The machine is seen at the NRM, York, on May 25, 2004 where it is now preserved.
‘Royal’ loco No. 47798 (formerly 1656), was one of a pair of Class 47s (the other was No. 47799) employed on Royal Train duties (and painted accordingly) between 1995-2004. The machine is seen at the NRM, York, on May 25, 2004 where it is now preserved.

The first Brush Type 4, No. 1500, forerunner of 512 Sulzer-engined Co-Co diesel electric locomotives built for British Railways at Brush’s Falcon Works at Loughborough (and painted/finished at Crewe works) was accepted into traffic on September 28, 1962. Since then, these versatile machines have been a familiar sight putting in sterling service across the UK rail network on goods and top link passenger turns alike. Despite the ‘Duff’ nickname (the result of a troubled start and early years) they are popular performers and still see main line use on charter workings and EMU drags.

On September 3, 1989, in Intercity Executive livery, No. 47483 (original number 1637) is stabled at Holyhead, while a Sealink ferry to Ireland is berthed at the station terminal to the right.
On September 3, 1989, in Intercity Executive livery, No. 47483 (original number 1637) is stabled at Holyhead, while a Sealink ferry to Ireland is berthed at the station terminal to the right.
The sixteenth machine to be built, No. D1515 (later 47415) trundles along at an unknown location on February 11, 1968, still in two-tone green livery with some empty two-axle mineral wagons.
The sixteenth machine to be built, No. D1515 (later 47415) trundles along at an unknown location on February 11, 1968, still in two-tone green livery with some empty two-axle mineral wagons.
Some animated discussion appears to be taking place on the platform at Garsdale, where No. 47474 (originally 1602) in standard BR blue has paused with the ‘Midlands Border Venturer’ railtour on May 13, 1978.
Some animated discussion appears to be taking place on the platform at Garsdale, where No. 47474 (originally 1602) in standard BR blue has paused with the ‘Midlands Border Venturer’ railtour on May 13, 1978.
 In BR large logo livery, No. 47441 (originally 1557) is seen with a train of two-axle aggregate wagons at Peak Forest on March 2, 1990. Note the two-axle cement wagons in the background and the Class 37 light engine on the left.
In BR large logo livery, No. 47441 (originally 1557) is seen with a train of two-axle aggregate wagons at Peak Forest on March 2, 1990. Note the two-axle cement wagons in the background and the Class 37 light engine on the left.

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